DrupalCon Amsterdam Day 4 Recap

DrupalCon Amsterdam Day 4 Recap

Amazee Labs Contribution Room

On day four, the contribution events started at 9 am, and folks had a few options: the First-Time Contributor Workshop, Mentored Contribution or General Contribution. The DrupalCon Amsterdam website had a handy little flowchart to help people decide which session would be best for them.

DCA Flow Graph Credit: https://events.drupal.org/amsterdam2019/contribution-events DCA

First-Time Contributor Workshop

This was a fully guided workshop, run by Brian Gilbert and Jordana Fung, as an opportunity for people who hadn’t contributed before to get up and running with the drupal.org issue queue and necessary tools needed to contribute. This seemed like a fantastic opportunity for people working with Drupal that may find the idea of contributing overwhelming or if they were unsure where to start. I spoke to someone that attended the workshop and they said the contribution process was broken down well, but unfortunately they ran into issues getting a development environment working (always the hardest bit!) so they didn’t quite get to solving an issue, but they said the slides provided will be an invaluable resource to refer back to and have more confidence with contributing now. What I’ve been hearing throughout the week at DrupalCon was reiterated in this workshop: “Even if you can’t make a patch, you can still contribute!”, which is a great encouragement for non-developers to contribute by other means such as creating translations, updating drupal.org documentation or volunteering at events, and highlights the diverse community.

Mentored Contribution

This session was aimed at those who were already comfortable with the issue queue and contributing, but still wanted some direction from the mentors that kindly gave up their time to guide groups of around eight. The focus was on Drupal core, where attendees were pointed to issues tagged with “Novice”. There had clearly been some good triage and tagging in preparation for the DrupalCon contribution day, as these issues were ready to go and usually had an additional comment to help clarify the issue. I think for a lot of us in this session, it introduced us to a different type of contribution, where we were working on issues that didn’t directly affect us, or our current project, and it felt good! Hopefully, there are some converted Drupal users that might devote some time to working through the core issue queue.

General Contribution

This was for those with clear intentions and a sense of purpose! This session seemed fairly freeform, but tables were grouped by topic e.g. search, Drupal 9, admin UI and frontend. Having previous experience contributing to a project/topic wasn’t necessary, so as long as you had experience with the issue queue, appropriate skills and an interest in a particular topic, you could rock up and chat to others at that table to get working on an appropriate issue.

Out of these options, I chose to join the Mentored Contribution session and immediately after arriving, I was allocated a table and mentor, got a development environment up and running, and we were tasked with working on Drupal core issues. It was helpful to have the mentor on-hand to discuss possible solutions and it felt great to be part of such a big contribution event - imagine how many comments and commits were made that day!

Amazee Labs Team

We also had an Amazee success in the General Contribution session, with Amazee’s own Philipp Melab releasing a stable 3.0 version of the GraphQL Drupal module, so congratulations to Philipp and everyone else who worked hard at the contribution day to get that finished.

I’m looking forward to contributing more outside my project-specific needs after being inspired to at DrupalCon and the contribution day was a great insight into the effort and hours that go into making Drupal what it is.